Science Highlights

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Welcome Back!

As you can see (since you're here), the web site is up and operating. We apologize we were down for a few months. We had some staffing issues, and we did not want to leave it unattended (which is not a good idea, particularly in terms of security) while working through them. Those issues have now been resolved. Having said that:

1) The blog will no longer be updated regularly. You've probably noticed that there have been no new entries for almost a year anyway. Part of the reason was due to the fact that, for a few months, the blog was not easily accessible for updating as we transitioned into the cloud (yes, we're now in the cloud). But a larger reason was a directive given to us to refocus our efforts elsewhere. Status updates and news about the sensors will continue to be posted.

2) NASA is instituting an agency wide assessment of its web site presence. How that assessment, and the directives that result from it, will affect this site is uncertain. While we await further instructions or directions, all aspects of the current site are, and should remain, operable.

Again, welcome back.

Smoke Over North America, 20 Aug 2018

The smoke has been so prevalent and long-lasting that I've run out of inventive and nifty titles for these blog items, so I'm resorting to dull titles with dates. That doesn't indicate a dull situation, however, as smoke continues to blanket much of the US and southern Canada (note I reduced the AI range down to from 0 to 5):

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Much of the smoke is low enough in the atmosphere to affect air quality in much of the west, all along the Front Range of the Rockies, and into the midwest. Unhealthy air advisories have been issued for the northwest:

https://www.airnow.gov/

And milky skies are evident as far east as Maine:

https://www.centralmaine.com/2018/08/20/wildfire-smoke-creates-hazy-sky-in-northern-maine/

Smoke Over North America, 19 Aug 2018

Fires in the northern most part of British Columbia are adding smoke to the smoke already being produced by those further south in the province and those in California and Oregon.

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I added the VIIRS RGB and hotspot image along side the one with the OMPS AI overlaid on top to, once again, highlight the ability of the AI to show aerosols over clouds. You can see the much larger extent of the cloud than is possible from just the VIIRS image. The smoke appears in all regions of the US and completely across Canada.

You can also see smoke from Russian fires over Alaska and coming down into northwest Canada.

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Data & Spacecraft News

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Ozone Hole 2017

Our 2017 Ozone Hole page is up:

https://ozoneaq.gsfc.nasa.gov/omps/ozone-hole/

LP Ozone Profile Version 2.5 Data Release

The OMPS Limb Profiler (LP) Version 2.5 (V2.5) ozone profile data product is now available. This product consists of daily files containing ozone density profiles from separate UV and visible wavelength retrievals. The combined altitude range of these profiles extends from cloud top to 52.5 km, with some overlap in the stratosphere. The ozone daily files also contain cloud detection and altitude information for each measurement over the altitude range 5-35 km. Regular OMPS LP observations began in April 2012, and continue to the present. The data files are available at this location:

https://ozoneaq.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/omps/

Data release notes and file description information are available at this location:

https://ozoneaq.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/

If you have questions about this product, please contact Matt DeLand (matthew.deland [ at ] ssaihq.com).

LP Aerosol Extinction Coefficient Version 1.0 Data Release

The OMPS Limb Profiler (LP) Version 1.0 (V1.0) aerosol extinction coefficient data product is now available. This product consists of daily files containing aerosol extinction coefficient profiles retrieved at 675 nm (AER675) over the altitude range 10-40 km. The AER675 files also contain cloud detection and altitude information for each measurement over the altitude range 5-35 km. Regular OMPS LP observations began in April 2012, and continue to the present. The data files are available at this location:

https://ozoneaq.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/omps/

Data release notes and file description information are available at this location:

https://ozoneaq.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/

If you have questions about this product, please contact Matt DeLand (matthew.deland@ssaihq.com).

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